The occurrence and distribution of the JAS Type A behavior pattern in a university student population

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dc.contributor.advisor Catano, Victor M. (Victor Michael), 1944-
dc.creator Hodson, Sandra, 1945-
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-09T12:32:39Z
dc.date.available 2011-05-09T12:32:39Z
dc.date.issued 1984
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/xmlui/handle/01/22736
dc.description vi, 77, [21] leaves : ill. ; 28 cm.
dc.description Bibliography: leaves 72-77.
dc.description.abstract The Type A behavior pattern, characterized by excessive competitive drive, aggressiveness, impatience, and time urgency has been associated with a twofold risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite the long term negative health effects of the behavior pattern, it has been resistant to change once established. Some clinicians propose that it may be more effective to prevent the development of this behavior pattern in young people rather than try to change it once it is well established. The present study examined the occurrence and distribution of the type A behavior pattern in students at two Maritime universities to examine (1) the degree to which university students reported Type A behaviors, (2) whether the level of Type A behavior varied with students from different programs of study, and (3) whether there were gender differences. A sample of 722 students drawn from four faculties and four levels of study were assessed by a modified form of the Jenkins Activity Survey (JAS). The results of this study indicate that university students scored similarly on the JAS to the normative Western Collaborative Group Study and relevant occupational samples on the Type A scale and the Speed-and-Impatience scale but scored lower on the Hard-Driving-and-Competitive scale. Commerce students obtained the highest JAS scores, followed by Engineering students. In general, JAS scores increased as students advanced from 1st year to graduate or professional study. Females scored higher than male students in all programs but Commerce. Demographic variables did not significantly relate to students’ JAS scores. These results identify four target groups for preventative programs: (1) Commerce students, (2) graduate students, (3) professional students, and (4) female students. Extremely high scores for females in graduate studies and Engineering suggest that women in non-traditional fields may be at particular risk. Questions related to the extent that Type A individuals actively choose occupations known to reinforce their behavior patterns and the extent to which the behavior pattern is shaped by environmental contingencies need to be examined.
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher Halifax, N.S. : Saint Mary's University
dc.subject.lcsh Personality
dc.subject.lcsh College students -- Psychology
dc.title The occurrence and distribution of the JAS Type A behavior pattern in a university student population
dc.type Text
thesis.degree.name Master of Science in Applied Psychology
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.discipline Psychology
thesis.degree.grantor Saint Mary's University (Halifax, N.S.)


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