The influence of tidal creek networks on wetland vegetation

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dc.contributor Bijman, Alison
dc.contributor.advisor Lundholm, Jeremy T. (Jeremy Todd), 1970-
dc.coverage.spatial Nova Scotia
dc.creator Bijman, Alison
dc.date.accessioned 2012-05-08T14:46:06Z
dc.date.available 2012-05-08T14:46:06Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/xmlui/handle/01/23794
dc.description 1 online resource (v, 40 leaves) : ill. (chiefly col.)
dc.description Includes abstract.
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 34-40).
dc.description.abstract Six years of research and experience with restoring Bay of Fundy (Nova Scotia) salt marshes have shown that salt marsh plant species can colonize readily without planting, if the barriers to tidal flow are removed and suitable abiotic conditions (i.e. elevation) are present. Reactivated hybrid creek networks are potentially highly important to the restoration process, as they may represent the primary transport mechanism for seeds and vegetative material for re-colonization. It is unknown how important the hybrid creeks are for the colonization of target species (Spartina alterniflora; S. patens; Salicornia europaea; Suaeda maritima; Atriplex spp.). Utilizing the Cogmagun River salt marsh restoration site (Hants County), restored in 2009, this research set out to discover if there was a relationship between proximity to creeks and the colonization rates of target salt marsh species. We were also interested in finding out if seedling coverage of Suaeda maritima in the previous year had a relationship with colonization rates in the following year. The results showed that colonization rates were positively related to proximity to the main tidal creek for four out of five target species (S. alterniflora, S. europaea, S. maritima, and Atriplex spp.). The presence of S. maritima in the previous year did increase the colonization rates of newly established communities. These results provide a fine-scale complement to existing and ongoing macro-scale studies and further clarify the relationships between abiotic properties of a recently restored tidal wetland and colonization. en_CA
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.publisher Halifax, N.S. : Saint Mary’s University
dc.title The influence of tidal creek networks on wetland vegetation en_CA
dc.type Text en_CA
thesis.degree.name Bachelor of Science (Honours Environmental Science)
thesis.degree.level Undergraduate
thesis.degree.discipline Environmental Science Program
thesis.degree.grantor Saint Mary’s University (Halifax, N.S.)


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