Stop signs on the wireless highway or rear-ended by Rogers: what can a small community stakeholder do?

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dc.coverage.spatial Prince Edward Island
dc.creator Mullally, Mark
dc.creator Driscoll, Cathy, 1962-
dc.date.accessioned 2014-02-06T18:35:07Z
dc.date.available 2014-02-06T18:35:07Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier http://library2.smu.ca/bitstream/handle/01/25407/asb_proceedings_2010.pdf#page=623
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/xmlui/handle/01/25636
dc.description.abstract This paper focuses on the company-stakeholder conflict between a large telecommunication company and a small community group over the placement of a cell phone tower in the community. The authors review the literature on stakeholder theory and the debate over who should count as a stakeholder. The findings of our case study illustrate how this company failed to live up to their espoused stakeholder practices and contribute to a better understanding of the contextual and dynamic aspects of company-community stakeholder conflict. Implications for future research are discussed. en_CA
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.publisher Atlantic Schools of Business en_CA
dc.subject.lcsh Radio and television towers -- Prince Edward Island
dc.subject.lcsh Wireless communication systems -- Prince Edward Island
dc.subject.lcsh Rogers Communications
dc.title Stop signs on the wireless highway or rear-ended by Rogers: what can a small community stakeholder do? en_CA
dc.type Text en_CA
dcterms.bibliographicCitation Proceedings of the 40th Atlantic Schools of Business conference, Saint Mary's University, 2010, pp 623-637


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