Practising lawyers in Nova Scotia: cognitive style and preferences for practice

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dc.creator Murphy, H. Joseph
dc.creator Doucette, Pauline A.
dc.creator Kelleher, William E.
dc.creator MacGillivary, Ann C.
dc.creator Reid, John G., 1948-
dc.creator Young, Jeffery D.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-03-14T18:05:09Z
dc.date.available 2014-03-14T18:05:09Z
dc.date.issued 1999
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/xmlui/handle/01/25777
dc.description.abstract The Cognitive Style Index and a demographic survey were administered to 524 practising lawyers in Nova Scotia. Results indicate that lawyers, as a group, have a more analytical than intuitive cognitive style. Differences between men and women and between partners and associates were nonsignificant statistically. This finding suggests lawyers are a more homogeneous group in terms of cognitive style than other groups such as law students and various groups of business managers. However, lawyers differed significantly in cognitive style across various preferred areas of practice. For example, those preferring criminal law scored statistically significantly lower on the Cognitive Style Index than those who preferred Real Estate and Construction law. Organizational behavior implications are discussed. en_CA
dc.format.extent 22 p.
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.publisher Atlantic Schools of Business en_CA
dc.subject.lcsh Lawyers -- Nova Scotia
dc.subject.lcsh Cognitive styles
dc.title Practising lawyers in Nova Scotia: cognitive style and preferences for practice en_CA
dc.type Text en_CA
dcterms.bibliographicCitation Proceedings of the 29th Atlantic Schools of Business Conference, Halifax, Nova Scotia,1999


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