The secular evolution of the primordial Kuiper Belt

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dc.creator Hahn, Joseph Michael
dc.date.accessioned 2015-02-06T15:28:16Z
dc.date.available 2015-02-06T15:28:16Z
dc.date.issued 2003-09
dc.identifier.issn 0004-637X
dc.identifier.issn 1538-4357
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/xmlui/handle/01/25942
dc.description Publisher's version/PDF en_CA
dc.description.abstract A model that rapidly computes the secular evolution of a gravitating disk-planet system is developed. The disk is treated as a nested set of gravitating rings, with the rings’/planets’ time evolution being governed by the classical Laplace-Lagrange solution for secular evolution but modified to account for the disk’s finite thickness h. The Lagrange planetary equations for this system yield a particular class of spiral wave solutions, usually called apsidal density waves and nodal bending waves. There are two varieties of apsidal waves—long waves and short waves. Planets typically launch long density waves at the disk’s nearer edge or else at a secular resonance in the disk, and these waves ultimately reflect downstream at a more distant disk edge or else at a Q barrier in the disk, whereupon they return as short density waves. Planets also launch nodal bending waves, and these have the interesting property that they can stall in the disk, that is, their group velocity plummets to zero upon approaching a region in the disk that is too thick to support further propagation of bending waves. The rings model is used to compute the secular evolution of a Kuiper Belt having a variety of masses, and it is shown that the early massive belt was very susceptible to the propagation of low-amplitude apsidal and nodal waves launched by the giant planets. For instance, these waves typically excited orbits to e ~ sin i ~ 0.01 in a primordial Kuiper Belt of mass M[subscript KB] ~ 30 Earth masses. Although these orbital disturbances are quite small, the resulting fractional variations in the disk’s surface density due to the short density waves is usually large, typically of order unity. This epoch of apsidal and nodal wave propagation probably lasted throughout the Kuiper Belt’s first ~ 10[superscript 7] to ~ 5 x 10[superscript 8] yr, with the waves being shut off between the time when the large R [greater than or similar to] 100 km Kuiper Belt objects first formed and when the belt was subsequently eroded and stirred up to its present configuration. en_CA
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.publisher American Astronomical Society en_CA
dc.relation.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/377195
dc.rights Article is made available in accordance with the publisher’s policy and is subject to copyright law. Please refer to the publisher’s site. Any re-use of this article is to be in accordance with the publisher’s copyright policy. This posting is in no way granting any permission for re-use to the reader/user.
dc.subject.lcsh Celestial mechanics
dc.subject.lcsh Kuiper Belt
dc.subject.lcsh Protoplanetary disks
dc.title The secular evolution of the primordial Kuiper Belt en_CA
dc.type Text en_CA
dcterms.bibliographicCitation Astrophysical Journal 595(1), 531-549. (2003) en_CA


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Article is made available in accordance with the publisher’s policy and is subject to copyright law. Please refer to the publisher’s site. Any re-use of this article is to be in accordance with the publisher’s copyright policy. This posting is in no way granting any permission for re-use to the reader/user.
 
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/377195
 
 

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