The road to integration among Arab countries : assessing the political and economic barriers and possibilities

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dc.contributor.advisor Fridell, Gavin
dc.coverage.spatial Arab countries
dc.creator ElAlfy, Amr
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-24T14:37:15Z
dc.date.available 2015-09-24T14:37:15Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.other HC498 E43 2015
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/xmlui/handle/01/26329
dc.description 160 leaves : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
dc.description Includes abstract and appendix.
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 120-135).
dc.description.abstract Arab countries attempts at regional integration started in the 1950s, but the goal of integration has produced very little substantive political or economic results. This lack of progress has blocked Arab countries from attaining benefits to their political and economic welfare that could accrue as a result. Arab Petro-states are reluctant to share the oil returns with other non-oil exporting countries, which have been struggling to develop their trade relations. Arab countries have not been able to develop their comparative advantages in trade due to historical problems, such as colonialism. Arab countries are also lacking effective supranational institutions that can balance the economic gains of integration among member states. This research outlines an implementation path that would ensure a realistic integration and application based on an assessment of past and current integration attempts with a special focus on the Greater Arab Free Trade Area (GAFTA), which is an Arab agreement that was signed in 1997. The assessment will determine the obstacles that have stinted past integration and how they relate to the status of integration in the Arab countries today. Unless Arab states have state-centric agreements, which share a common vision of developing industrial and agricultural bases that aims at developing states’ dynamic comparative advantages, the total intra-trade impact on Arab countries will be slightly positive or even negative since integration will result in trade diversion. Arab states can accept short-term losses that can result from trade diversion or loss of tariff revenues on condition that their comparative advantages can be developed on the long term. Finally, this thesis highlights the economic and non-economic benefits and obstacles of integration using statistical analyses that simulate the economic benefits of Arab intra-regional cooperation. en_CA
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.publisher Halifax, N.S. : Saint Mary's University
dc.subject.lcc HC498
dc.subject.lcsh Arab cooperation
dc.subject.lcsh Arab countries -- Economic integration
dc.title The road to integration among Arab countries : assessing the political and economic barriers and possibilities en_CA
dc.type Text en_CA
thesis.degree.name Master of Arts in International Development Studies
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.discipline International Development Studies Program
thesis.degree.grantor Saint Mary's University (Halifax, N.S.)


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