Finding common ground on a journey from pain to hope : CoSA as restorative justice

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dc.contributor.advisor Crocker, Diane
dc.creator Doran, Larissa
dc.date.accessioned 2018-05-14T14:17:38Z
dc.date.available 2018-05-14T14:17:38Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/handle/01/27520
dc.description 1 online resource (50 p.)
dc.description Includes abstract and appendices.
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 39-40).
dc.description.abstract This thesis examines restorative justice principles and theories in order to determine if the program Circles of Support and Accountability (CoSA) can be considered a restorative justice program. Six face-to-face unstructured interviews were also conducted with volunteer, core, and staff members of CoSA Halifax using a narrative approach. A thematic analysis of the interviews was then completed. Based on the research, it is concluded that Circles of Support and Accountability can be considered restorative justice. en_CA
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.publisher Halifax, N.S. : Saint Mary's University
dc.title Finding common ground on a journey from pain to hope : CoSA as restorative justice en_CA
dc.title.alternative CoSA as restorative justice
dc.type Text en_CA
thesis.degree.name Bachelor of Arts (Honours Criminology)
thesis.degree.level Undergraduate
thesis.degree.discipline Sociology and Criminology
thesis.degree.discipline Saint Mary's University (Halifax, N.S.)


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