What they do in the shadows: stable isotope analysis reveal that spatial and temporal heterogeneity explain dietary niche variation in Myotis lucifugus in Newfoundland

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dc.creator Fouts, Cody Randall
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-05T14:26:09Z
dc.date.available 2018-07-05T14:26:09Z
dc.date.issued 2018-04-30
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/handle/01/27567
dc.description.abstract Individuals must balance competitive and environmental pressures with obtaining the nutrients necessary to survive and reproduce. The goal of this project was to infer on individual dietary adaptations of adult female Myotis lucifugus from a maternity group. Therefore, I conducted stable isotope analysis on feces (n = 127), arthropods (n = 110), and hair (n = 120) collected from known individuals across two timescales (feces sampled May-August 2017; hair sampled 2012-2017). I used a Bayesian mixing model (MixSIAR) and an information-theoretic approach to determine models that best explained variation in isotopic niche. Isotopic niche variation across both timescales was strongly explained by spatial and temporal heterogeneity, with little explanatory power provided by inter-individual or reproductive group heterogeneity. Diets of individual bats were opportunistic, with strong dependence on the most abundant prey groups, although diets of most individuals contained a limited amount of all prey groups. en_CA
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.title What they do in the shadows: stable isotope analysis reveal that spatial and temporal heterogeneity explain dietary niche variation in Myotis lucifugus in Newfoundland en_CA
dc.type Text en_CA


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