Source expertise as a factor of social influence

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dc.creator van der Valk, Alexandra
dc.date.accessioned 2019-01-08T18:44:12Z
dc.date.available 2019-01-08T18:44:12Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/handle/01/28209
dc.description Winner, Upper Level Best Overall Undergraduate Paper, Social Sciences en_CA
dc.description.abstract The growth of social media and screen-to-screen interaction has prompted investigation into how social influence can persuade decision-makers without face-to-face interaction. Our research explores whether the reputation (Expert, Novice, or Neutral) of a fake, anonymous peer can change an individual’s (1) judgment conformity, (2) decision confidence, or (3) trust in that peer. Eighty-eight university students answered 10 trivia questions, giving numerical estimations before and after viewing a fake peer’s response. Participants rated their confidence in each estimate, and rated their trust towards the source after each question. Results found that (1) participants exposed to an Expert’s opinion improve judgment accuracy through assimilation, but those influenced by a Novice worsen accuracy through reactance; (2) decision confidence ratings increase in all groups; (3) trust towards the Expert is significantly higher than towards both the Novice and Neutral peers. Associations are also explored between these three outcomes and the participants’ personality traits and cultural orientations. en_CA
dc.format.extent 1 online resource (28 p.)
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher Saint Mary's University, Writing Centre
dc.title Source expertise as a factor of social influence en_CA
dc.type Text en_CA
dcterms.bibliographicCitation Afficio Undergraduate Journal, (2017)


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