Integrating Indigenous knowledge into environmental management in Nova Scotia

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dc.creator Hangle, Courtney
dc.date.accessioned 2019-04-01T17:12:40Z
dc.date.available 2019-04-01T17:12:40Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/handle/01/28279
dc.description Overall Winner, Winner, Science (Upper Undergraduate) en_CA
dc.description.abstract This literature review outlines the integration of Indigenous Knowledge (IK) into environmental management in Nova Scotia. While current Western environmental management practices are steeped in history, Western science, and anthropocentric perspectives toward nature, Indigenous ecological worldviews may provide an alternative method of managing the natural world, while also including First Nations in environmental decision-making. The potential benefits of IK have been recognized by policy-makers and included in large-scale local and global policy, such as the UN Convention on Biological Diversity—an international Treaty with 168 signatories (Convention on Biological Diversity, n.d., n.p.; Turner, Ignace, & Ignace, 2000, p. 1275). Even so, there are challenges in merging two modes of thinking about the environment, including stereotypes and communication barriers. However, Nova Scotia has made great strides toward the inclusion of Indigenous perspectives, and Mi’kmaq perspectives specifically, through the creation of First Nations-governed environmental organizations such as the Unamak’ki Institute of Natural Resources and the Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs Secretariat, both of which have strong ties to the federal government (McGregor, 2016, p. 46-48; McMillan & Prosper, 2016, p. 640; UINR, 2016c, para. 3). Nevertheless, Indigenous involvement must continue to increase within the context of environmental problem-solving in Nova Scotia, especially regarding the status of eels, which may be dealt with through proposed amendments to the Fisheries Act (Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 2018, para. 4; Giles, Fanning, Denny, & Paul, 2016, 167-183; Species at Risk Public Registry, 2013, n.p.). en_CA
dc.format.extent 1 online resource (15 p.)
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher Saint Mary's University, Writing Centre en_CA
dc.title Integrating Indigenous knowledge into environmental management in Nova Scotia en_CA
dc.type Text en_CA
dcterms.bibliographicCitation Afficio Undergraduate Journal, (2018)


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