“We need to understand their background, their circumstances and their plights and try to assist them” : a critical examination of the influence of race and gender on diversion to mental health court

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Livingston, James D.
dc.creator Greenidge, Ariann
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-04T14:33:15Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-04T14:33:15Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/handle/01/28976
dc.description 1 online resource (77 pages)
dc.description Includes abstract and appendices.
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (pages 52-55).
dc.description.abstract Both people of colour and offenders with mental illness are overrepresented within the criminal justice system. With all these overrepresentations, its imaginable that there is an overlap of racialized offenders with mental illnesses. Diversion strategies are used as alternatives that divert accused persons away from incarceration and towards treatment and support services. One such alternative is problem-solving courts, which were developed to treat offenders with special needs, as opposed to traditional prosecution. The literature that discusses how diversionary alternatives, such as mental health courts, is silent when discussing how race may influence access to diversion for people of colour. Additionally, intersectionality has shown how social constructs work together to define experiences for each individual, yet diversion also fails to take this into consideration. Using the theoretical frameworks of critical race theory and intersectionality, I explore the influence that race and gender have on diversion to mental health court. My study is conducted through semi-structured interviews with the Nova Scotia Mental Health Court team members. Additionally, I carried out an observation of both the pre-court team meetings and the court proceedings to contextualize the responses of participants. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis which produced three overarching themes: Diversity and Visibility, Accessibility, and Power. The findings implicated that race was influential in diversion; however, it appears to stem from referrals, rather than screenings for eligibility within the court. Additionally, gender was perceived as having less influence on diversion to the court. en_CA
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.publisher Halifax, N.S. : Saint Mary's University
dc.title “We need to understand their background, their circumstances and their plights and try to assist them” : a critical examination of the influence of race and gender on diversion to mental health court en_CA
dc.title.alternative Influence of race and gender on diversion
dc.type Text en_CA
thesis.degree.name Bachelor of Arts (Honours Criminology)
thesis.degree.level Undergraduate
thesis.degree.discipline Criminology
thesis.degree.grantor Saint Mary's University (Halifax, N.S.)


Files in this item

 
 

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record