The changing face of the Halifax Peninsula : a narrative of transition

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dc.contributor.advisor Novak, Mathew
dc.creator Macdonald, Katherine A.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-05-27T17:54:00Z
dc.date.available 2020-05-27T17:54:00Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/xmlui/handle/01/29357
dc.description 1 online resource (vi, 68 pages) : colour illustrations, colour maps
dc.description Includes abstract and appendices.
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (pages 59-61),
dc.description.abstract The urban landscape of the Halifax Peninsula has altered greatly over the 11-year period from 2009 to 2019. While surges in development affect the city in a plethora of ways, one of its most significant impacts is apparent in streetscape change This alteration of urban structure presents the opportunity to chronicle a city in transition. Utilising the theory of creative destruction to situate the findings, the primary aim of this study is to describe and capture the effects of a newly invigorated development climate long characterised by stagnation. Employing Google Street View as a source of visual data for comparative analysis, this study demonstrates the utility of public domain software in studying built landscapes. GIS provides additional veracity in quantifying morphological change. Findings reveal that peninsular Halifax has undergone rapid transformation as a result of redevelopment, resulting in intensified land usage and densification. Most prevalent amongst study sites are multi-storey mixed-use structures, in contrast to previously smaller scale land uses. New built forms display a high degree of homogeneity common to urban centres across North America; while these developments are largely concentrated within the downtown core, they increasingly encroach into surrounding neighbourhoods and threaten local heritage. Development activity will likely have various social and economic implications, representing uncertainties for existing and potential residents in the form of new uses of urban space. en_CA
dc.description.provenance Submitted by Greg Hilliard (greg.hilliard@smu.ca) on 2020-05-27T17:54:00Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Macdonald_Katherine_Honours_2020.pdf: 36203368 bytes, checksum: 3b3244515d096e8e91b3dd889ec17b76 (MD5) en
dc.description.provenance Made available in DSpace on 2020-05-27T17:54:00Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Macdonald_Katherine_Honours_2020.pdf: 36203368 bytes, checksum: 3b3244515d096e8e91b3dd889ec17b76 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2020-04-14 en
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.publisher Halifax, N.S. : Saint Mary's University
dc.title The changing face of the Halifax Peninsula : a narrative of transition en_CA
dc.type Text en_CA
thesis.degree.name Bachelor of Arts (Honours Geography and Environmental Studies)
thesis.degree.level Undergraduate
thesis.degree.discipline Geography and Environmental Studies
thesis.degree.grantor Saint Mary's University (Halifax, N.S.)
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