The differential association theory and patterns of behavior in the delinquent individual : a study to establish whether the delinquent individual learns his patterns of behavior from the delinquent individuals with whom he associates

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dc.coverage.spatial Nova Scotia
dc.creator Power, Joseph
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-09T12:32:30Z
dc.date.available 2011-05-09T12:32:30Z
dc.date.issued 1966
dc.identifier.other HV9069 P68
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/xmlui/handle/01/22662
dc.description iv, 70 leaves ; 28 cm.
dc.description Bibliography: leaves 69-70.
dc.description Online version unavailable; print version available from Patrick Power Library.
dc.description.abstract This study investigates juvenile delinquent behavior and the effect gang associations and personality has on behavior once a delinquent has accepted or has been chosen for differential association. Edwin Sutherland’s theory on differential association was used as a starting point and a guide throughout. It is an individual thesis divided into two separate parts; the main project was written as one part of a group study of the clients at a Welfare agency while the other project was an independent study of the clients at a Mental Health Clinic. The active records of forty-nine male delinquents at the department of Public Welfare in Halifax were the source of the data for the main project; thirty-six records of male delinquents from a special project completed for the years 1957-59 at the Halifax Mental Health Clinic for Children were the source of the data for the independent study. Data relevant to this individual thesis was extracted from the schedules and statistical tests of significant (Fisher’s exact test of significance and Fisher’s test for significance levels) carried out. The hypothesis that the pattern of offenses in the delinquent individual should somewhat resemble the pattern of offenses of the individuals with whom he associates was found to be insignificant. The type of influence the gang has on the delinquent individual was found also not to be significant. The methodology proved faulty for two reasons—the lack of a control group of nondelinquents and the lack of personal interviewing of delinquents. It was concluded that social workers need to be made more aware of a group approach to delinquents and delinquent gangs and some recommendations were offered in this regard.
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher Halifax, N.S. : Saint Mary's University
dc.subject.lcc HV9069
dc.subject.lcsh Juvenile delinquency -- Nova Scotia -- Halifax
dc.subject.lcsh Social groups
dc.title The differential association theory and patterns of behavior in the delinquent individual : a study to establish whether the delinquent individual learns his patterns of behavior from the delinquent individuals with whom he associates
dc.type Text
thesis.degree.name Master of Social Work
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.discipline Social Work Program
thesis.degree.grantor Saint Mary's University (Halifax, N.S.)
thesis.degree.grantor Maritime School of Social Work


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