Medicaid expansion and the U.S. secular boom : the crowding out of religion's social insurance function

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dc.contributor.advisor Dilmaghani, Maryam
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.creator Hammond, Samuel
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-16T15:09:56Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-16T15:09:56Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/xmlui/handle/01/25814
dc.description 1 online resource (52 p.) : col. ill.
dc.description Includes abstract and appendix.
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 41-50).
dc.description.abstract Since 1990 the share of the U.S. population claiming no religion has more than doubled. This paper analyzes the causes of this “secular boom” using the conception of religious organizations as informal insurance providers. Applying panel estimation techniques to data from the General Social Survey and Religious Congregations & Membership Study, my results consistently demonstrate that the growth in the non-religious population was caused by the massive expansion of public assistance medical benefits, principally Medicaid, in the early 90’s. Transmission mechanisms are discussed, including the role of religious public hospitals. en_CA
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.publisher Halifax, N.S. : Saint Mary's University
dc.title Medicaid expansion and the U.S. secular boom : the crowding out of religion's social insurance function en_CA
dc.type Text en_CA
thesis.degree.name Bachelor of Arts (Honours Economics)
thesis.degree.level Undergraduate
thesis.degree.discipline Economics
thesis.degree.grantor Saint Mary's University (Halifax, N.S.)


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