Immigrant settlement patterns in Canada: Does elasticity of substitution between immigrants and native-born workers matter?

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dc.creator Barnes, Brett
dc.date.accessioned 2021-09-13T17:23:00Z
dc.date.available 2021-09-13T17:23:00Z
dc.date.issued 2021-08-13
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/xmlui/handle/01/29868
dc.description.abstract Although the number of immigrants coming to Canada has been steady in the past two decades, their location distribution is uneven across provinces. The proportion of immigrants in each province varies from 29 percent of the total population to as low as 2.4 percent. This paper will explore the effects that elasticity of substitution has on immigrant settlement patterns. This paper adds an alternative approach to the reasoning behind the disproportionate immigrant settlement. Using a constant elasticity of substitution model and information from the 2016 Census we find that the elasticity of substitution does show similar trends to the proportion of immigrants in a population. en_CA
dc.description.provenance Submitted by Greg Hilliard (greg.hilliard@smu.ca) on 2021-09-13T17:22:59Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Barnes_Brett_MRP_2021.pdf: 525201 bytes, checksum: 0f76edbe4c9c054f817d7263f549b43c (MD5) en
dc.description.provenance Made available in DSpace on 2021-09-13T17:23:00Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Barnes_Brett_MRP_2021.pdf: 525201 bytes, checksum: 0f76edbe4c9c054f817d7263f549b43c (MD5) Previous issue date: 2021-08-13 en
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.title Immigrant settlement patterns in Canada: Does elasticity of substitution between immigrants and native-born workers matter? en_CA
dc.type Text en_CA
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